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car accidents Archives

Red-light cameras save lives but need more public support

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety recorded more than 800 deaths from red-light running collisions in 2016. Of those fatalities, more than half were pedestrians, bicyclists and occupants in vehicles other than the offender. Residents of Oklahoma should know that installing traffic cameras has long been encouraged as a way for communities to reduce the number of red-light violations and crashes.

Too many Americans are driving drowsy, AASM survey finds

Drowsy driving is 100% preventable, and so it is an act of negligence when one engages in it. Every year in Oklahoma and across the U.S., drowsy driving leads to an average of 328,000 auto accidents, 6,400 of which are fatal. This is according to a report from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

AAA finds increased car accidents with automated safety devices

Progress toward fully automated vehicles, like any other technological innovation, relies upon stepping stones. In this case, the steps are the implementation of sensor technology in partially automated systems that provide safety assistance to drivers. But what happens when the safety system actually decreases safety? Research by industry groups found that some of the more popular safety devices relying on partial automation technology could be placing Oklahoma drivers at a higher risk of a car accident.

New cars may soon detect alcohol on drivers' breaths

Oklahoma residents may be wondering what is being done to curb drunk driving. The problem, it seems, is not a lack of awareness. Technological advances, though, have been made that are helping to prevent the intoxicated from operating their vehicle, and just recently, a bill was introduced in Congress that would require alcohol detection tech on all new cars by 2024.

Study shows drivers using phones in riskier ways

Distracted driving rates may or may not be increasing in Oklahoma specifically, but there is no doubt that drivers are using their phones in riskier ways than before. This is according to a study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Researchers looked at two observational surveys that involved drivers in four Northern Virginia communities as they approached and stopped at red lights.

Daylight saving changes increase accident risk

Though many people in Oklahoma enjoy setting back their clocks an hour each fall and getting an extra hour of sleep, first responders and police know that the changes mean more car accidents. Taking extra care driving during the week following changes to daylight saving time may help drivers prevent accidents from occurring.

Car accident deaths decline, but serious dangers remain

American highways can be dangerous places for people in Oklahoma and across the country. Still, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration highlighted some positive movement, reporting that fatalities linked to car crashes declined by 2.4% in 2018, a drop for the second year in a row following a spike in 2015. According to the NHTSA, this decline is largely linked to better, safer cars produced with technological updates that can make crashes less likely. However, the toll taken by motor vehicle accidents continues to be significant. Around 36,560 people were killed on the roads in 2018, and hundreds of thousands more were severely injured.

Doubts arise as cities replace traffic lights with roundabouts

There are only about 5,000 roundabouts in Oklahoma and across the U.S., making them a rare sight for most drivers. However, more and more cities are replacing traffic lights with these structures in the effort to improve traffic flow and safety. According to statistics, the roundabouts are, in fact, doing their job effectively.

What to think about when driving during the fall

Oklahoma roads can become slick with rain and leaves as the calendar turns to fall. Leaves that fall off of trees can make it harder to see potholes, lane lines and other markings. Leaves that are still on the trees can prove distracting to tourists and others who may be in town just to see them change colors. Therefore, it is important for drivers to slow down and to increase their following distance.

Weather, late hours and distractions worry teen drivers' parents

University researchers who surveyed parents of teenagers concluded that parents should actively encourage their teens to drive safely and promote responsible driving behavior among their peers. The survey of 900 parents of children aged 14 to 18 identified bad weather as a major concern for parents. Volatile weather, which is common in Oklahoma, worried 68% of parents, who often prevented their teens from riding with teen drivers when weather conditions were potentially hazardous.

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